top of page
Open Site Navigation
FEATURES
FEATURES
SPECIALTIES
SPECIALTIES

Physical Therapy

FEATURES
FEATURES
GET STARTED
LOG IN
SPECIALTIES
SPECIALTIES

Physical Therapy

Billing

Documentation

Insurance Verification

Texting and Reminders

Online Patient Forms

Online Scheduling

Scheduling

Billing

Documentation

Texting and Reminders

Online Scheduling

Electronic Benefit Verification

Online Patient Forms

Scheduling

  • Writer's pictureAndrea Ryan

Ultimate Guide to ICD-10 Codes for Elbow Injury

There are several types of elbow injuries or disorders that can be effectively treated with physical therapy. Physical therapy treatments for elbow injuries or disorders may include exercises to improve strength and flexibility, joint mobilization techniques, manual therapy, modalities such as ice and heat, and education on proper technique and posture during activities that may contribute to the injury. In some cases, bracing or taping may also be used to support the elbow during activity.


Treatment of elbow injuries is manageable with physical therapy and can lead to a full recovery. Coding each treatment correctly, though, can mean the difference between reimbursement from insurance or a discrepancy in the books for the practice. Selecting the right ICD-10 code the first time can ensure that your practice is paid in a timely manner. Following are many of the most common elbow injuries that can be treated with physical therapy along with their appropriate ICD-10 codes.





Lateral epicondylitis


Lateral epicondylitis, commonly known as "tennis elbow," is a condition characterized by pain and tenderness on the outer part of the elbow. Despite its name, tennis elbow can occur in anyone who repeatedly uses their forearm muscles and tendons, not just tennis players.


The condition is caused by overuse or repetitive strain on the tendons that attach to the lateral epicondyle, a bony bump on the outer part of the elbow. This repetitive strain can cause small tears in the tendons, leading to inflammation and pain. Symptoms of lateral epicondylitis may include pain and tenderness on the outer part of the elbow, pain that worsens with gripping or lifting objects, and weakness in the forearm.


Treatment for lateral epicondylitis may include rest, ice, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), physical therapy, and in some cases, corticosteroid injections. A physical therapist can work with individuals to develop a personalized treatment plan that includes exercises to stretch and strengthen the affected muscles and tendons, as well as techniques to improve posture and ergonomics to avoid further strain on the elbow. With appropriate treatment, most people with lateral epicondylitis can recover fully and return to their normal activities.


The ICD-10 codes for lateral epicondylitis are:


  • M77.0 - Lateral epicondylitis (Tennis elbow) of elbow

  • M77.01 - Lateral epicondylitis, right elbow

  • M77.02 - Lateral epicondylitis, left elbow

  • M77.09 - Lateral epicondylitis, unspecified elbow


These codes are used by healthcare providers to document the diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis in medical records and insurance claims.


Medial epicondylitis


Medial epicondylitis, also known as "golfer's elbow," is a condition characterized by pain and tenderness on the inner side of the elbow. It is similar to lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) but affects the tendons on the inside of the elbow instead of the outside.


The condition is caused by overuse or repetitive strain on the tendons that attach to the medial epicondyle, a bony bump on the inner part of the elbow. This repetitive strain can cause small tears in the tendons, leading to inflammation and pain. Symptoms of medial epicondylitis may include pain and tenderness on the inner part of the elbow, pain that worsens with gripping or lifting objects, and weakness in the forearm.


Treatment for medial epicondylitis may include rest, ice, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), physical therapy, and in some cases, corticosteroid injections. A physical therapist can work with individuals to develop a personalized treatment plan that includes exercises to stretch and strengthen the affected muscles and tendons, as well as techniques to improve posture and ergonomics to avoid further strain on the elbow. With appropriate treatment, most people with medial epicondylitis can recover fully and return to their normal activities.


The ICD-10 codes for medial epicondylitis are:


  • M77.1 - Medial epicondylitis (Golfer's elbow) of elbow

  • M77.11 - Medial epicondylitis, right elbow

  • M77.12 - Medial epicondylitis, left elbow

  • M77.19 - Medial epicondylitis, unspecified elbow


Ulnar collateral ligament injury


A UCL injury is an injury to the ulnar collateral ligament, which is located on the inner side of the elbow joint. This type of injury is common in athletes who participate in throwing sports, such as baseball, softball, and javelin.


The UCL helps to stabilize the elbow joint during the throwing motion, and repetitive stress can cause the ligament to become stretched or torn. Symptoms of a UCL injury may include pain on the inner side of the elbow, weakness in the arm, a decreased ability to throw, and a feeling of instability in the elbow joint.


Treatment for a UCL injury depends on the severity of the injury. In some cases, rest and rehabilitation exercises may be enough to allow the ligament to heal on its own. In more severe cases, surgery may be necessary to repair or reconstruct the ligament. Rehabilitation after surgery may involve physical therapy to regain strength, range of motion, and throwing mechanics.


The ICD-10 codes for UCL injury are:


  • S53.402A - Sprain of Ulnar collateral ligament of elbow, unspecified arm, initial encounter

  • S53.402D - Sprain of Ulnar collateral ligament of elbow, unspecified arm, subsequent encounter

  • S53.402S - Sprain of Ulnar collateral ligament of elbow, unspecified arm, sequela

  • S53.401A - Sprain of Ulnar collateral ligament of right elbow, initial encounter

  • S53.401D - Sprain of Ulnar collateral ligament of right elbow, subsequent encounter

  • S53.401S - Sprain of Ulnar collateral ligament of right elbow, sequela

  • S53.403A - Sprain of Ulnar collateral ligament of left elbow, initial encounter

  • S53.403D - Sprain of Ulnar collateral ligament of left elbow, subsequent encounter

  • S53.403S - Sprain of Ulnar collateral ligament of left elbow, sequela


Bursitis of the elbow


Bursitis of the elbow is a condition characterized by inflammation of the bursae, which are small fluid-filled sacs that cushion the joints and reduce friction between bones and soft tissues. The bursae near the elbow are located between the skin and the bony prominence of the elbow, and when they become inflamed, it can cause pain, swelling, and limited range of motion in the joint.


Bursitis of the elbow is typically caused by repetitive stress or overuse of the elbow joint, such as from throwing sports or activities that require repeated bending and straightening of the elbow. It can also be caused by direct trauma or infection.


Symptoms of bursitis of the elbow may include pain and tenderness on the tip of the elbow, swelling and redness around the joint, stiffness or limited range of motion, and a warm sensation around the joint.


Treatment for bursitis of the elbow may include rest, ice, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and physical therapy to improve range of motion and strengthen the surrounding muscles. In some cases, aspiration (draining) of the inflamed bursa or corticosteroid injections may be necessary. With appropriate treatment, most people with bursitis of the elbow can recover fully and return to their normal activities.


The ICD-10 codes for elbow bursitis are:


  • M70.20 - Prepatellar bursitis, unspecified knee

  • M70.21 - Prepatellar bursitis, right knee

  • M70.22 - Prepatellar bursitis, left knee

  • M70.30 - Other bursitis, unspecified knee

  • M70.31 - Other bursitis, right knee

  • M70.32 - Other bursitis, left knee

  • M70.40 - Olecranon bursitis, unspecified elbow

  • M70.41 - Olecranon bursitis, right elbow

  • M70.42 - Olecranon bursitis, left elbow


Osteoarthritis of the elbow


Osteoarthritis of the elbow is a degenerative joint disease that causes the protective cartilage on the ends of bones to wear down over time. This can result in bone-on-bone contact, leading to pain, stiffness, and limited range of motion in the elbow joint.


Osteoarthritis of the elbow can be caused by a variety of factors, including age, genetics, previous joint injuries or surgeries, and overuse of the elbow joint. People who engage in activities that place repetitive stress on the elbow, such as baseball pitchers or tennis players, may also be at higher risk for developing osteoarthritis of the elbow.


Symptoms of osteoarthritis of the elbow may include pain, stiffness, and tenderness in the joint, as well as a grinding or cracking sensation during movement. The joint may also feel warm or swollen, and the range of motion may be limited.


Treatment for osteoarthritis of the elbow may include pain management with over-the-counter or prescription medications, physical therapy to improve range of motion and strengthen the surrounding muscles, and corticosteroid injections to reduce inflammation. In severe cases, surgery may be necessary to remove damaged tissue or replace the joint.


Although there is no cure for osteoarthritis of the elbow, early diagnosis and treatment can help manage symptoms and prevent further joint damage.


The ICD-10 codes for osteoarthritis of the elbow are:


  • M19.23 - Post-traumatic osteoarthritis, elbow

  • M19.242 - Idiopathic osteoarthritis, left elbow

  • M19.241 - Idiopathic osteoarthritis, right elbow

  • M19.24 - Other primary osteoarthritis, elbow

  • M19.29 - Other secondary osteoarthritis, elbow


It's important to note that the use of these codes may vary depending on the healthcare provider and the specific circumstances of the patient's diagnosis. Finding the right code for the appropriate treatment can be simple with the help of PatientStudio’s integrated EMR. To find out more details, book a demo of PatientStudio’s revolutionary physical therapy practice management system today.








bottom of page